The Microscope That Changed the World FE Electron Microscope —IEEE Milestone— The Microscope That Changed the World FE Electron Microscope —IEEE Milestone—JAPAN

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Landmark Events

1972 Pioneering Development of the World's First Practical FE-SEM

Contributing to High-Resolution SEMs

The intensity of the electron beam source was the main bottleneck restricting the resolution of electron microscopes. Could FE technology, which has an extremely high intensity, be used to address the issue? That was the breakthrough idea that paved the way for high-resolution scanning electron microscopes.

HFS-2

1984 Development of a CD-SEM as a Semiconductor Metrology System

Contributing to the Development of Ultra-Fine Semiconductor Devices

The semiconductor industry has seen fierce competition in product development. In this context, Hitachi has established metrology technology for ultra-fine dimensions by driving the evolution of the FE-SEM from a visualization to measurement device. Hitachi is a global pioneer in this field.

S-6000

1985 Successful Observation and Photography of the AIDS Virus

Contributing to Advancement of Healthcare and Biotechnology Fields

'There it is!'
The AIDS virus was believed to be spherical in shape. Under an electron microscope, however, the AIDS virus is actually globular with many rounded protrusions.

Photographed with the UHS-T1 Ultra-high Resolution FE-SEM by Dr. Keiichi Tanaka, professor emeritus at Tottori University

1986 Concluding Arguments on Aharonov-Bohm Effect

Contributing to Research and Advancement in Science and Technology

There were numerous theoretical discussions.However, none of these discussions could decisively settle the debate about the Aharonov-Bohm effect*.The debate was finally settled by electron beam holography using a FE-TEM.

*Aharonov-Bohm effect:
In 1959, Yakir Aharonov and David Bohm stated that a potential was itself a fundamental physical entity, and would affect a charged particle even in a region in which there was no electronic or magnetic field. An electron microscope image of a toroidal (doughnut-shaped) superconductive magnet which completely confines the magnetic field inside, captures a shift in electron interference pattern (see photo) between the inside and outside of the magnet. This image was the decisive proof showing the effect of electromagnetic potential, and lead to the complete verification of the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

Photographic evidence of the Aharonov-Bohm effect